Examining the Growth Patterns of Brazilian Cities

39 Pages Posted: 14 Oct 2005

See all articles by Daniel Da Mata

Daniel Da Mata

Getulio Vargas Foundation (FGV) - Sao Paulo School of Economics

Uwe Deichmann

World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG)

J. Vernon Henderson

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Somik V. Lall

World Bank

Hyoung Gun Wang

Brown University

Date Written: September 2005

Abstract

The share of urban population in Brazil increased from 58 to 80 percent between 1970 and 2000 and all net population growth over the next 30 years is predicted to be in cities. This paper explores population growth and its implications for economic dynamics and income generation among 123 urban agglomerations. Incomes are higher in larger agglomerations and in the South, but there is some indication of regional convergence with higher rates of income growth in poorer areas. In particular, agglomerations in the North and Central-West are growing faster than the more established urban centers in the South. Economic dynamics point to a process of increased diversification among larger cities, and greater specialization among medium-sized agglomerations. In bigger centers there is a trend toward deconcentration toward the periphery. The paper provides a simple analysis of correlates of labor supply, as measured by population growth and economic productivity, which is proxied by changes in per capita income.

Suggested Citation

Da Mata, Daniel and Deichmann, Uwe and Henderson, J. Vernon and Lall, Somik V. and Wang, Hyoung Gun, Examining the Growth Patterns of Brazilian Cities (September 2005). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 3724, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=822347

Daniel Da Mata

Getulio Vargas Foundation (FGV) - Sao Paulo School of Economics ( email )

Rua Itapeva 474
São Paulo, São Paulo 01332-000
Brazil

Uwe Deichmann (Contact Author)

World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG) ( email )

1818 H. Street, N.W.
MSN3-311
Washington, DC 20433
United States

J. Vernon Henderson

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) ( email )

Houghton Street
London, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Somik V. Lall

World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

HOME PAGE: http://econ.worldbank.org/staff/slall

Hyoung Gun Wang

Brown University ( email )

Box 1860
Providence, RI 02912
United States

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