Beyond Accumulation and Technical Progress: Negative Externalities as an Engine of Economic Growth

University of Siena Economics Working Paper No. 390

28 Pages Posted: 2 Jan 2004

See all articles by Stefano Bartolini

Stefano Bartolini

University of Siena - Department of Economics

Date Written: July 2003

Abstract

The traditional explanation of growth based on the primum and secundum movens of accumulation and technical progress, faces two major empirical anomalies. Why do people work so much i.e. why do they strive so much for money? The growth literature provides no answer to these question, nor to the further and very important one of why people are so unhappy. Moreover, finding a joint answer to the two questions seems particularly puzzling. Why do people strive so much for money if money cannot buy happiness? I argue that the solution to this 'paradox of happiness' can be provided by including in the theory a tertium movens of growth: negative externalities. These externalities can be of two kinds. The first are positional externalities, i.e. those due the fact that individuals may be interested in relative not absolute position. The second kind of negative externalities are those which reduce free goods. Some recent models, both evolutionary or with optimising agents, show the role of these externalities as an engine of growth. This approach emphasises that the growth process generates extensive negative externalities which reduce the capacity of the social and natural environment to furnish free goods. In these models individuals have increasingly to rely on private goods in order to prevent a reduction in their well-being or in their productive capacity due to decline in social and natural capital. This generates an increase in output which feeds back into the negative externalities, giving rise to a self-reinforcing mechanism whereby growth generates negative externalities and negative externalities generate growth. According to these models, growth appears to be a substitution process whereby free final (or intermediate) goods are progressively replaced with costly goods in the consumption (or production) patterns of individuals. From the point of view of this GASP (Growth As Substitution Process) models the two anomalies of growth theory are two sides of the same coin. People strive so much for money because they have to defend themselves against negative externalities: they work so much in order to substitute free goods with costly ones. But an increase in income does not improve their happiness because it involves a process of substitution of free goods costly ones. Some implications for environmental economics are drawn.

Keywords: happiness, growth, labor supply, negative externalities, accumulation, technical progress, sustainable development, endogenous growth

JEL Classification: D62, D69, J20, O00, Q01

Suggested Citation

Bartolini, Stefano, Beyond Accumulation and Technical Progress: Negative Externalities as an Engine of Economic Growth (July 2003). University of Siena Economics Working Paper No. 390, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=467002 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.467002

Stefano Bartolini (Contact Author)

University of Siena - Department of Economics ( email )

Piazza S. Francesco, 7
Siena, I-53100
Italy
+05 77 232648 (Phone)
+05 77 232661 (Fax)

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
195
Abstract Views
2,320
rank
189,000
PlumX Metrics