The Family Origin of the Math Gender Gap is a White Affluent Phenomenon

15 Pages Posted: 12 Jan 2021

See all articles by Gaia Dossi

Gaia Dossi

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics

David Figlio

Northwestern University

Paola Giuliano

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Anderson School of Management; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Paola Sapienza

Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management - Department of Finance; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

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Date Written: January 2021

Abstract

Previous research has shown that norms around the role of women in society could help explain the gender gap in mathematics, and that these norms could be transmitted within the family. Using data from the Florida Department of Education combined with birth certificates we uncover important heterogeneity in the transmission of gender biases within the family. We find that gender role norms can explain the lower performance of girls in mathematics only in relatively affluent White families, whereas they do not apparently matter for the performance of Black girls.

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Suggested Citation

Dossi, Gaia and Figlio, David and Giuliano, Paola and Sapienza, Paola, The Family Origin of the Math Gender Gap is a White Affluent Phenomenon (January 2021). NBER Working Paper No. w28326, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3763854

Gaia Dossi (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics ( email )

United Kingdom

David Figlio

Northwestern University ( email )

2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States

Paola Giuliano

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Anderson School of Management ( email )

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Los Angeles, CA 90095-1481
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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

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Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) ( email )

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IZA Institute of Labor Economics

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Paola Sapienza

Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management - Department of Finance ( email )

Evanston, IL 60208
United States
847-491-7436 (Phone)
847-491-5719 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

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