A Note on Long-Run Persistence of Public Health Outcomes in Pandemics

33 Pages Posted: 12 May 2020 Last revised: 6 Feb 2021

See all articles by Zhixian Lin

Zhixian Lin

University of California, Davis

Christopher M. Meissner

University of California, Davis

Date Written: May 2020

Abstract

Covid-19 is the single largest threat to global public health since the Spanish Influenza pandemic of 1918-20. Was the world better prepared in 2020 than it was in 1918? After a century of public health and basic science research, pandemic response and mortality outcomes should be better than in 1918-20. We ask whether mortality from historical pandemics has any predictive content for mortality in the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. We find a strong persistence in public health performance in the early days of the Covid-19 pandemic. Places that performed poorly in terms of mortality in 1918 were more likely to have higher mortality today. This is true across countries and across a sample of US cities. Experience with SARS is associated with lower mortality today. Distrust of expert advice, lack of cooperation at many levels, over-confidence, and health care supply shortages have likely promoted higher mortality today as in the past.

Suggested Citation

Lin, Zhixian and Meissner, Christopher M., A Note on Long-Run Persistence of Public Health Outcomes in Pandemics (May 2020). NBER Working Paper No. w27119, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3597851

Zhixian Lin (Contact Author)

University of California, Davis

Christopher M. Meissner

University of California, Davis ( email )

One Shields Avenue
Apt 153
Davis, CA 95616
United States

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