The Motivations of External Whistleblowers and Their Impact on the Intention to Blow the Whistle Again

12 Pages Posted: 28 Apr 2020

See all articles by Heungsik Park

Heungsik Park

Chung-Ang University

David Lewis

Middlesex University - Business School

Date Written: July 2019

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to inquire into the relative importance of morality, cost‐benefit, and emotion as motivations for the decision to blow the whistle externally, and the effects of such factors as motivations, perceived negative consequences, and preferences for reform on the intention to blow the whistle again. Based on a literature review, we formulated some hypotheses and, to test them, we used the data collected from a survey of 127 external whistleblowers in South Korea. The results revealed that morality was the most important motivation, followed by emotion, and then cost‐benefit, which thus, seemed to be the least important for the whistleblowers. Morality as a motivation and the perceived negative consequences of whistleblowing had a significant effect on the intention to blow the whistle again. This study helps advance the understanding of the motivations behind whistleblowing and the factors that influence the intention to blow the whistle again.

Suggested Citation

Park, Heungsik and Lewis, David, The Motivations of External Whistleblowers and Their Impact on the Intention to Blow the Whistle Again (July 2019). Business Ethics: A European Review, Vol. 28, Issue 3, pp. 379-390, 2019, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3587843 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/beer.12224

Heungsik Park (Contact Author)

Chung-Ang University ( email )

221 Heuksuk-dong
Dongjak-gu
Seoul, 156-756
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

David Lewis

Middlesex University - Business School ( email )

The Burroughs
London, NW4 4BT
United Kingdom

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
2
Abstract Views
136
PlumX Metrics