A Bioeconomic Model of Cattle Stocking on Rangeland Threatened by Invasive Plants and Nitrogen Deposition

17 Pages Posted: 28 Apr 2020

See all articles by David Finnoff

David Finnoff

University of Wyoming

Aaron Strong

University of Wyoming

John Tschirhart

University of Wyoming

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: November 2008

Abstract

Across western North America, invasive plant species and elevated levels of nitrogen are threatening the productivity of rangelands. A bioeconomic model of stocking cattle on these rangelands is used to show that optimal stocking depends on the competition between native grasses and the invaders. However, nitrogen deposition is important in determining the ultimate rangeland species composition. Endogenous changes in plant successional thresholds are due to the interplay of nitrogen deposition and stocking practices. Nonoptimal overstocking can create ecosystem niches for invaders where they would not have occurred at lower stocking rates, although what constitutes overstocking depends on the nitrogen levels.

Keywords: invasive species, nitrogen deposition, optimal stocking, rangeland

Suggested Citation

Finnoff, David and Strong, Aaron and Tschirhart, John, A Bioeconomic Model of Cattle Stocking on Rangeland Threatened by Invasive Plants and Nitrogen Deposition (November 2008). American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 90, Issue 4, pp. 1074-1090, 2008, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3585263 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8276.2008.01166.x

David Finnoff (Contact Author)

University of Wyoming ( email )

1000 E University Ave
Laramie, WY 82071
United States

Aaron Strong

University of Wyoming

Box 3434 University Station
Laramie, WY 82070
United States

John Tschirhart

University of Wyoming

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