Household Structure and Short‐Run Economic Change in Nicaragua

Journal of Marriage and Family, 2009

Posted: 8 Jan 2019

See all articles by Paul Winters

Paul Winters

International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)

Guy Stecklov

Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Faculty of Social Sciences

Jessica Erin Todd

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) - Economic Research Service (ERS)

Date Written: July 30, 2009

Abstract

During the economic crises Nicaragua suffered between 2000 and 2002, a conditional cash transfer program targeting poor households began operating. Using panel data on 1,397 households from the program's experimentally designed evaluation, we examined the impact of the program on household structure. Our findings suggest that the program enabled households to avoid reagglomeration during the economic crises, with households in control communities growing more than treated households. These changes were driven primarily by shifts in residence of relatively young men and women with close kinship ties to the household head. In contrast, households that received transfers continued to send off young adult members, suggesting that the program provided resources to overcome the short‐term economic pressures on household structure.

Suggested Citation

Winters, Paul and Stecklov, Guy and Todd, Jessica Erin, Household Structure and Short‐Run Economic Change in Nicaragua (July 30, 2009). Journal of Marriage and Family, 2009, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3306675

Paul Winters (Contact Author)

International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) ( email )

Via Paolo di Dono
Rome, 00142
Italy

Guy Stecklov

Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Faculty of Social Sciences ( email )

Jerusalem
Israel

Jessica Erin Todd

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) - Economic Research Service (ERS) ( email )

355 E Street, SW
Washington, DC 20024-3221
United States
(202) 694-5363 (Phone)

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