Comment on 'Computerizing Industries and Routinizing Jobs: Explaining Trends in Aggregate Productivity' by Sangmin Aum, Sang Yoon (Tim) Lee and Yongseok Shin

12 Pages Posted: 17 Mar 2018 Last revised: 10 Jul 2018

See all articles by Matthias Kehrig

Matthias Kehrig

Duke University; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Date Written: June 3, 2018

Abstract

Aum, Lee, and Shin (2018) quantify the impact of production complementarities and differential productivity growth across occupations and sectors on the slowdown of aggregate productivity growth. This note expands their work to study substitutability between new computer equipment and labor in individual occupations as opposed to all occupations combined. Preliminary empirical evidence suggests (1) significantly different elasticities of substitution between computers and labor across occupations and (2) a strong correlation between productivity growth of computers and labor in occupations where these two inputs are complementary. When they are substitutes, however, their productivity growth rates appear uncorrelated. These findings have the potential to amplify or weaken the magnitude of the aggregate productivity slowdown explained by Aum, Lee, and Shin (2018) making their approach a promising avenue for future research.

Keywords: Occupation-Specific Technical Change, Productivity Growth Slowdown, Computer-Occupation Complementarity, Labor Share

JEL Classification: E2, O3, O4

Suggested Citation

Kehrig, Matthias, Comment on 'Computerizing Industries and Routinizing Jobs: Explaining Trends in Aggregate Productivity' by Sangmin Aum, Sang Yoon (Tim) Lee and Yongseok Shin (June 3, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3142660 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3142660

Matthias Kehrig (Contact Author)

Duke University ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://sites.google.com/site/matthiaskehrig/research

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

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Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) ( email )

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