Well-Being Effects of Extreme Weather Events in the United States

Posted: 28 Jan 2017 Last revised: 21 Apr 2018

See all articles by Mona Ahmadiani

Mona Ahmadiani

University of Georgia - Department of Agricultural & Applied Economics

Susana Ferreira

University of Georgia

Date Written: October 9, 2017

Abstract

We match forty-two billion-dollar disasters with individual survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System between 2005 and 2010 to estimate the effect of extreme weather events on the subjective well-being of U.S. residents Our results indicate that natural disasters have a negative and robust impact on subjective well-being, and that this impact decays over time, disappearing 6 to 8 months after the event. Finding severe storms as the main culprit in the reduction of individual life satisfaction in our sample, we show that their impact diminishes further than 50 km from the affected counties. We then investigate the attenuating impact of health care access and natural-peril insurance and find a partial compensating role for both protective measures.

Keywords: Subjective well-being, extreme weather, disasters, climate change

JEL Classification: Q54, I31

Suggested Citation

Ahmadiani, Mona and Ferreira, Susana, Well-Being Effects of Extreme Weather Events in the United States (October 9, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2907022 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2907022

Mona Ahmadiani (Contact Author)

University of Georgia - Department of Agricultural & Applied Economics ( email )

Susana Ferreira

University of Georgia ( email )

Athens, GA 30602-6254
United States

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