Historical Origins of a Major Killer: Cardiovascular Disease in the American South

36 Pages Posted: 21 Dec 2015 Last revised: 3 Feb 2021

See all articles by Richard H. Steckel

Richard H. Steckel

Ohio State University (OSU) - Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Garrett Senney

Office of the Comptroller of the Currency

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Date Written: December 2015

Abstract

When building major organs the fetus responds to signals via the placenta that forecast post-natal nutrition. A mismatch between expectations and reality creates physiological stress and elevates several noninfectious chronic diseases. Applying this concept, we investigate the historical origins of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the American South using rapid income growth from 1950 to 1980 as a proxy for socioeconomic forces that created unbalanced physical growth among southern children born after WWII. Using state-level data on income growth, smoking, obesity and education, we explain over 70% of the variance in current CVD mortality rates across the country.

Suggested Citation

Steckel, Richard H. and Senney, Garrett, Historical Origins of a Major Killer: Cardiovascular Disease in the American South (December 2015). NBER Working Paper No. w21809, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2706310

Richard H. Steckel (Contact Author)

Ohio State University (OSU) - Economics ( email )

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Garrett Senney

Office of the Comptroller of the Currency ( email )

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