Job Loss by Wage Level: Lessons from the Great Recession in Ireland

32 Pages Posted: 23 Sep 2015

See all articles by Brian Nolan

Brian Nolan

Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School

Sarah Voitchovsky

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute: Applied Economic & Social Research

Date Written: September 15, 2015

Abstract

This paper explores the pattern of job loss in the Great Recession with a particular focus on its incidence by wage level, using data for Ireland. Ireland experienced a particularly pronounced decline in employment with the onset of the recession, by international and historical standards, which makes it a valuable case study. Using EU-SILC data, our analysis identifies which employees were most affected. The results show that the probability of staying in employment, from one year to the next, is positively related to monthly wages both during the boom and in the bust. The gradient with wages, however, is much more marked in the bust, and remains significantly so even after controlling for a range of individual characteristics including part-time status, demographics, education, labour market history, industries or occupations.

Keywords: Skills, occupations, wages, Great Recession, Ireland, job loss, EU-SILC

JEL Classification: E24, J23, J24, J62, J63

Suggested Citation

Nolan, Brian and Voitchovsky, Sarah, Job Loss by Wage Level: Lessons from the Great Recession in Ireland (September 15, 2015). Melbourne Institute Working Paper No. 17/15, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2661120 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2661120

Brian Nolan

Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School ( email )

Eagle House
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United Kingdom
+441865610401 (Phone)

Sarah Voitchovsky (Contact Author)

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute: Applied Economic & Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

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