Bearing the Defense Burden, 1886-1989: Why Spend More?

Journal of Conflict Resolution October 2003 47: 551-573

24 Pages Posted: 3 May 2015

See all articles by Benjamin E. Goldsmith

Benjamin E. Goldsmith

School of Politics & International Relations - Australian National University

Date Written: October 1, 2003

Abstract

Competing hypotheses are tested on an extensive set of defense-burden data to determine the general factors that influence states' levels of military spending. Results provide some clear answers to longstanding questions and supply new findings that beg further investigation. When controls are introduced for domestic political and economic factors, several international factors, including alliances and rivalries, lose statistical significance. Consistent with liberal theory, regime type has a robust effect: democracies spend proportionately less on defense than other states. As implied by realism, under conditions of economic growth or high levels of wealth, “extra” resources are diverted disproportionately to the military.

Keywords: military spending, defense burden, economic growth and decline, democratic peace, international relations

Suggested Citation

Goldsmith, Benjamin E., Bearing the Defense Burden, 1886-1989: Why Spend More? (October 1, 2003). Journal of Conflict Resolution October 2003 47: 551-573, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2601722

Benjamin E. Goldsmith (Contact Author)

School of Politics & International Relations - Australian National University ( email )

Canberra
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://researchers.anu.edu.au/researchers/goldsmith-b

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