The March to Washington: Allard K. Lowenstein in the United States House of Representatives, 1968-1970

171 Pages Posted: 3 Apr 2015

Date Written: April 15, 1983

Abstract

Early in the first session of the 91st Congress, the Democratic Majority Leader in the United States House of Representatives asked a new member, Allard K. Lowenstein, to stand in as majority leader, an honor not usually accorded a Freshman Member so early into his first term. After having led the Dump Johnson movement and organizing Eugene McCarthy's campaign for the Presidency, Lowenstein had only recently been elected — for his first and only term — to the House by the people of New York State's Fifth Congressional District in Nassau County. Already having achieved national recognition because of his opposition to President Johnson's war policies, Lowenstein quickly made a name for himself on Congress as a powerful Congressional dove — perhaps the leading antiwar legislator. This thesis examines the impact of Lowenstein on this volatile period in American History. From his commitment to engaging students and activists from around the country in the political system, to the deep communion he earned with fellow Congressman, Lowenstein’s unwavering belief in the political heritage of the United States opened the eyes of Congress and the public alike to many of the arguments and political criticisms that served as the basis for dissent in America in the late 1960s.

Keywords: US House of Representatives, US Congress, 1960s, Anti-War, Legislation, Social Unrest, Social Change, Political Change

JEL Classification: H56, N42

Suggested Citation

Feigen, Marc, The March to Washington: Allard K. Lowenstein in the United States House of Representatives, 1968-1970 (April 15, 1983). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2588557 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2588557

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