Formal Employee Training Programs and Their Impact on Labor Produc- Tivity: Evidence from a Human Resources Survey

39 Pages Posted: 3 May 2004 Last revised: 10 Apr 2021

See all articles by Ann P. Bartel

Ann P. Bartel

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: July 1989

Abstract

Although economic models of training decisions are framed in terms of a company's calculation of the costs and benefits of such training, empirical work has never been able to test this model directly on company behavior. This paper utilizes a unique database to analyze the determinants of the variation in formal training across businesses and the impact of such training on labor productivity. Major findings are that large businesses, those introducing new technology end those who rely on internal promotions to fill vacancies are more likely to have formal training programs. Formal training is found to have a positive effect on labor productivity.

Suggested Citation

Bartel, Ann P., Formal Employee Training Programs and Their Impact on Labor Produc- Tivity: Evidence from a Human Resources Survey (July 1989). NBER Working Paper No. w3026, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=256903

Ann P. Bartel (Contact Author)

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics ( email )

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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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