Nineteenth Century US BMIs by Race: Socioeconomics and Biology

31 Pages Posted: 31 Oct 2012

See all articles by Scott A. Carson

Scott A. Carson

University of Texas of the Permian Basin; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Date Written: October 30, 2012

Abstract

Little research exists on late 19th and early 20th century US body mass index value differences by race, and darker complexions were associated with greater BMI values. Mulattos had greater BMI returns associated with socioeconomic characteristics, indicating that while blacks had greater BMIs than fairer complexioned whites and mulattos, part of the difference was offset by socioeconomic characteristics that favored fairer complexions. Black, mulatto, and white BMIs declined between 1860 and 1920, and farmers had greater BMIs than workers in other occupations.

Keywords: Nineteenth century US race relations, body mass index, biological inequality

JEL Classification: I100, J110, J710, N310

Suggested Citation

Carson, Scott A., Nineteenth Century US BMIs by Race: Socioeconomics and Biology (October 30, 2012). CESifo Working Paper Series No. 3971, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2168698

Scott A. Carson (Contact Author)

University of Texas of the Permian Basin ( email )

4901 East University
Odessa, TX 79762
United States

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

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