The 'Heyneman-Loxley Effect' in Sub-Saharan Africa: School Quality, Socioeconomic Status and National Economic Development

34 Pages Posted: 21 Apr 2011

See all articles by David Zumbach

David Zumbach

University of Zurich - Centre for Comparative and International Studies (CIS); University of Zurich - Institute for Political Science

Date Written: June 25, 2010

Abstract

Based on data out of the 1970s, the "Heyneman-Loxley Effect" proposed that in developing countries, school characteristics were more important than family socioeconomic status in determining school achievement. In this paper, I reassess these findings using 2000s data on 14 sub-Saharan African countries, and find a partial reversal of this effect. Multilevel model analysis reveal that school characteristics in the African context become even more important when national economic development increases.

Note: Downloadable document is in German.

Keywords: School achievement, school quality, socioeconomic status, sub-Saharan Africa

JEL Classification: I00, I21, N37

Suggested Citation

Zumbach, David, The 'Heyneman-Loxley Effect' in Sub-Saharan Africa: School Quality, Socioeconomic Status and National Economic Development (June 25, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1815463 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1815463

David Zumbach (Contact Author)

University of Zurich - Centre for Comparative and International Studies (CIS) ( email )

Affolternstrasse 56
8050 Zurich
Switzerland

University of Zurich - Institute for Political Science ( email )

Dep. of International Relations
Seilergraben 49
CH-8001 Zurich
Switzerland

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