Riding the Wave of Trade: Explaining the Rise of Labor Regulation in the Golden Age of Globalization

58 Pages Posted: 28 Sep 2009 Last revised: 6 Jul 2010

See all articles by Michael Huberman

Michael Huberman

University of Montreal

Christopher M. Meissner

University of California, Davis

Date Written: September 2009

Abstract

The received view pins the adoption of labor regulation before 1914 on domestic forces. Using directed dyad-year event history analysis, we find that trade was also a pathway of diffusion. Market access served as an important instrument to encourage a level playing field. The type of trade mattered as much as the volume. In the European core, states emulated the labor regulation of partners because intraindustry trade was important. The New World exported less differentiated products and pressures to imitate were weak.

Suggested Citation

Huberman, Michael and Meissner, Christopher M., Riding the Wave of Trade: Explaining the Rise of Labor Regulation in the Golden Age of Globalization (September 2009). NBER Working Paper No. w15374, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1478792

Michael Huberman (Contact Author)

University of Montreal ( email )

C.P. 6128 succursale Centre-ville
Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7
Canada

Christopher M. Meissner

University of California, Davis ( email )

One Shields Avenue
Apt 153
Davis, CA 95616
United States

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