Slave Prices, Geography and Insolation in 19th Century African-American Stature

43 Pages Posted: 2 Oct 2007

See all articles by Scott A. Carson

Scott A. Carson

University of Texas of the Permian Basin; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Date Written: September 2007

Abstract

The use of height data to measure living standards is now a well-established method in the economic literature. Moreover, while much is known about 19th century black legal and material conditions, less is known about how 19th century institutional arrangements were related to black stature. Although modern blacks and whites reach similar terminal statures when brought to maturity under optimal biological conditions, 19th century African-American statures were consistently shorter than whites, indicating a uniquely 19th century phenomenon may have inhibited black stature growth. It is geography and insolation that present the most striking attribute for 19th century black stature, and greater insolation and higher slave prices are documented here to be associated with taller black statures.

Keywords: nineteenth century, African-American stature, slave prices, insolation, vitamin D

JEL Classification: I32, J15, N31

Suggested Citation

Carson, Scott A., Slave Prices, Geography and Insolation in 19th Century African-American Stature (September 2007). CESifo Working Paper No. 2105, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1018598

Scott A. Carson (Contact Author)

University of Texas of the Permian Basin ( email )

4901 East University
Odessa, TX 79762
United States

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

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